Sunday, October 30, 2005


FROM "NO WAR" TO "YES WAR"


Well the only major nation in the world without a standing army just couldn't stand it anymore, being so solitarily peaceful (it's boring and unmanly; what good is power if you can't wield it however you want to, like other bastions of freedom?) and wants to have armed forces that can legally invade other countries and stuff at the whim of some fraudulently elected incompetent, like the big guys are doing… not that they will, of course, they say, nothing of the kind, that's the furthest thing from our minds they say, until one cannot but think they protest too much...

But the LDP – I mean Japan, the one-party democracy – clearly wants to do more than just some inyerface war shrine visiting once a year, more than just refuse compensation to comfort women, more than just deny in high school history books that the Nanjing Massacre ever happened with the last army Japan had, and all that stuff you're reduced to doing when you've had no army for so long you can't even remember what war is like, so they've come up with a draft of a new constitution that drops the famous 'no war' clause in favor of what must logically be a 'yes war' clause, so if the draft is approved by the still largely group-think populace, in a few years the politicos can just import a few of those handy Diebold voting machines and Japan too can elect some cryptovicious undergrowth who just loves having an army with other people's children it it; who knows where that will take the world?

I'm so old I can still remember when "We the people" used to mean something...

4 comments:

Dalene said...

Idealistically and hopefully, and in the historically circular way history has of repeating itself, not only does the bad of history repeat itself, but also the best of history repeats itself and we will see again when "We the people" means what it can mean, what it was meant to mean.

ted said...

Some days it's harder to live here than others.

ellen said...

not to sound like a stuck up american...but you do know that the reason japan could survive w/o an army was because the us swore to protect it in order to control the former enemy after wwII don't you?

Robert Brady said...

And Japan's former army got them into that mess. Japan has had a standing self-defense army ever since its post-war constitution, which was, in its way, an ideal example to the world. A non-invading army will never be enough for the rightists, though...