Monday, November 13, 2006


NIGHT BAMBOO 1


Standing out in the strong wind last night getting a good soft buffeting, listening to the air itself roar the way it does when seasons change, in the castoff light from the house windows I watched the same bamboo I always see as a wall of vegetation in the light of day when I look out the window or glance up from gardening or firewooding-- but now in the light upon the dark and as a figure in the picture myself I saw the bamboo as if on a stage, saw how it lived and moved in ancient understanding of the roar of an autumn night, it was a different beast, clearly alive now, collective in its singularity, truer to its nature there in the night world, where seeing is of no point and being is all--

I'd always thought of the bamboo in itself as individual stalks; this is the variety they make fishing rods out of, mountain bamboo, grows taller than a man but is slender and crowded, too densely for any but wild pigs, ferrets and snakes to get comfortably through, maybe a fox now and then (the bamboo and the animals share a primordial alliance of noses and shapes) but now in the hurry of the night each light-paled stalk was on its own, yet one with all the others, like a school of bright fish in the sea they were together, shifting and swerving, shining and turning as one golden mass in the roiling ocean of the air, that ocean moving with and around them, 'together' in its deepest meaning, wind and stalk, air and plant in one vast thought swaying, vibrating; both surrendering, both prevailing, the air moving on, the bamboo letting it go, holding fast to the earth, each stalk reaching even in the night for the light of the day to come, in ancient and undying trust.

5 comments:

Thomas said...

What I really like about this blog are your fantastic observations of the nature around you. You seem to have found what all of us are looking for - a place to live where you are in peace with your surroundings... at least until the monkeys need some rocks thrown after them! :-)

Are there any neighboring houses for sale to another gaijin? Just checking...

Bonita said...

I can almost hear the sound of those bamboo leaves sliding in the wind. Very calming, indeed.

Chancy said...

Here in the southern US, bamboo attracts large crows who awaken those nearby with their rancous cawing at the crack of dawn. A friend of mine had this bamboo and crows problem.

She had a "Crow Scare" get together and many of her neighbors came over just at sunset with pots and pans to try and scare off the crows with a loud metallic racquet before they nested in the bamboo.

The last I heard, the crows won.

Maya's Granny said...

Robert,
How lovely it sounds.

Chancy,
The crows always win.

Robert Brady said...

Thomas, as an insider I've heard of old farmouses uplake going for 5 mil (yen); email me if in earnest...