Tuesday, April 12, 2011


ONE MONTH, ONE DAY


From the time Echo told me on Sunday morning that Kasumi and family had already left to head back up north, I started having this strange feeling, a feeling I've never had before. It was in the realm of the plunging heart, but it wasn't sadness or disappointment, nor was it depression, frustration or any of those emotional shadows that one can overcome by simply standing fast.

When your aims are sufficiently in your charge, you have the emotional buttress of being in control; but when, inevitably, time and the vectors of events slip around you, edge you to the side, advice is all you can give, and fear lays its arm across your shoulders.



--
"Here was my boat and here was the wave," he says, holding one hand low and the other stretched high above his head. "I climbed the wave like a mountain. When I thought I had got to the top, the wave got even bigger."



11 comments:

J at www.jellyjules.com said...

ugh. I keep reading. This story keeps breaking my heart. Seems like the nuclear thing is going to be more of a long term problem, and is more of what we read about in the U.S., but the day to day situation of those directly influenced and affected by the tsunami especially are more on the forefront in Japan. Am I missing this entirely?

Robert Brady said...

The reactor story has major coverage here of course, with dull experts scrawling on graphs and discussing microsieverts by the hour, but there's as much or more coverage of the aftermath and the countless human interest stories therein, which are enthralling, saddening and uplifting. The reactor coverage is uninspiring data, in the main, so is watched less by the general populace I expect, apart from updates...The ongoing quake-tsunami-reactor story makes up about 80% of the news, I'd say, from the snatches I manage to watch...

Antares Cryptos said...

Robert, I've been reading for a while, we're inundated with sensationalist updates, but hear very little about the uplifting and inspiring stories, small but far from insignificant. Never seen you respond before, wasn't sure if you read the comment, but thank you for sharing this with us.

Best wishes to you and your family.

Robert Brady said...

Thanks Antares. I always read the comments, and respond now and then, when windows of time and mind afford, which is a lot less often lately... but now that the Trio of Brio has departed, and planting time has not yet arrived, it is my pleasure. Thanks again.

Nevin said...

Hi Bob,

I used to live in Tsuruga (94 to 04) and also spent some time in Hitachi in Ibaraki back in the 90s.

You may be interested in the following Twitter user:
@daniel_garcia_r

He's a research scientist working in Tsuruga, and posts a lot about rad levels in Ibaraki.

catmomaj said...

Your words today so eloquently expressed what many of us have felt at one time or another in our lives. That is when each of us need to look for the simple beauties for relief. The other day a common garden moth was in my kitchen. It could have stayed there until it's life-span quit. I chose to carefully carry it in the palm of my hand to the front porch where I watched it flutter and soar upwards to a freedom no human will ever know. Made my day! :o)

Maggie said...

After an emergency test of the San Onofre reactore today, everyone is feeding us hot air. I read you first thing every day....thank you for all this. You are a gift.

tracyd said...

Peace Dear Robert!! Been catching up here reading your updates on the condition of things. This is all so unbelievable. I'm going to connect with sending socks. I want to do something like this...more personal. Always thinking of you and yours...

vegetablej said...

I know how you feel about the children. Age counsels and stands aside, but not without an inner shout or two. May all be well with them--and you.

:)

Kalei's Best Friend said...

It seems the boat captain was a chosen angel!. Amazing story.

joared said...

Continue to appreciate the links and info you provide here. The human interest stories encapsulate the continuum of all emotions.