Monday, June 25, 2007

PRIMAL DIMNESS

At around dawn this morning, just as I was stirring back into to consciousness, in the quiet primal dimness of world and mind I heard some monkeys chatting upmountain in their screechy language about the state of the world and at once thought nightmarily of my just-burgeoning tomatoes and my new bean plants out there just beginning to stand on their own so as to produce my beans, and that it has been raining pretty hard for the past day or two, so the simians must be hungry and restive after being hunched up in drippy clammy treetops for so long with nothing but screeches for entertainment, and might just for the spite of it go around pulling up the new bean plants and biting the tiny green tomatoes of creatures fortunate enough to live dryly and well-fed in houses, so I decided the best thing I could do was go back to sleep and think about it later. There are times when you've just got to pull your foot up.

6 comments:

Winston said...

I need to check the records archives to be certain, but I think you just set a new world record for most words in a sentence that almost makes sense.

Chancy said...

"There are times when you've just got to pull your foot up."

I have "put my foot down" many times but never in my recent memory have I "pulled my foot up"

What does that expression mean?

Foot off the accellerator?
Step out of it?

Shake the dust of a thought off your shoe?

Restrain from doing anything about a situation?


Or maybe not?

Bob Brady said...

In the primal dimness I felt the need for a new idiom, to wit: you pull your foot up when you're strongly not in the mood to put your foot down, as when producing Zs in large quantity.

Chancy said...

Thanks Bob.

There are several current situations in my own life where I could benefit from
"pulling my foot up"

Anna said...

I just visualised a foot that had reached floorwards from under the duvet being tucked back in again. And a very generous reaction too

Bob Brady said...

anna, that is very much what prompted the neoidiom, in the fogs of drowse.